DIRTY RICHMOND

Where the city is dirty but the people are not
(Street style, fashion, and life in Richmond, Virginia)
@dirtyrichmond/dirtyrva@gmail.com

It seems as if everything in Kristen Ziegler’s humble Fan District apartment has effortlessly been placed in perfect order. This is exactly what is expected of a young entrepreneur that has fearlessly founded her own professional organizing business, and continues to debunk the myth that professional organizing is a field exclusively of hobbyist. Holding a Certified Professional Organizers license, a member of the National Association of Professional Organizers and a background in architecture, Kristen has an uncanny sixth sense super power of looking at a space beyond the clutter and seeing what it has the potential to become.

Minima is not just the name sake of the professional organizer’s business but a philosophy that has holistically been adopted into her life. “Minima, it doesn’t get more simple than that. It is the root of minimalist, the spirit of the person, the spirit of the place. It’s about rawness and honesty.”



Tip From a Professional Organizer #1: Only keep enough serving ware (i.e. dishes, cups, utensils) for one day’s use. Store extras on a high shelf for guests. This will prevent the inevitable massive dirty dish pile up.













Tip From a Professional Organizer #2: Use matching hangers in your closet so that you can focus on the clothing itself rather than be distracted by an array of different sizes and colors. Also organize by sleeve/pant/skirt length (and color if you’re feeling ambitious). This method not only helps you see what you have, but also see what you might need. For instance - by putting all of your long-sleeve button up shirts together, you might realize that you have an overabundance of the same color or style. Next time you’re out shopping, you might decide to invest in something less redundant.



When speaking of her path to launching Minima, Kristen describes this as a perfect storm of events that she had to get through with complete honesty; losing her architecture job during the peak of the recession, the dissolve of a long term relationship, and oh yeah, fighting cancer. Kristen Ziegler is a bad ass in every sense of the word and truly believes that the services she provides as an organizer go beyond aesthetics, but leads to helping people in a real way. “You can’t control life,” says the 29 year old entrepreneur, “but you can control your environment and that can give you a sense of control.”

Tip From a Professional Organizer #3: Create a “landing zone” (i.e. hooks and a bench or credenza) by the door to keep everything that comes and goes on a day to day basis - keys, bags, store returns, hats, coats, etc. I also keep all of my shoes and jewelry by the door with a mirror to check my completed outfit before leaving.

Kristen is a burst of energy and a pleasure to be around.The Minima owner is an active member of the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) and currently serves as the Communications and Technology Director for the Richmond NAPO chapter. For more information on Minima and the services she provides visit the Minima website or follow Minima on tumblr.

It seems as if everything in Kristen Ziegler’s humble Fan District apartment has effortlessly been placed in perfect order. This is exactly what is expected of a young entrepreneur that has fearlessly founded her own professional organizing business, and continues to debunk the myth that professional organizing is a field exclusively of hobbyist. Holding a Certified Professional Organizers license, a member of the National Association of Professional Organizers and a background in architecture, Kristen has an uncanny sixth sense super power of looking at a space beyond the clutter and seeing what it has the potential to become.

Minima is not just the name sake of the professional organizer’s business but a philosophy that has holistically been adopted into her life. “Minima, it doesn’t get more simple than that. It is the root of minimalist, the spirit of the person, the spirit of the place. It’s about rawness and honesty.”

Tip From a Professional Organizer #1: Only keep enough serving ware (i.e. dishes, cups, utensils) for one day’s use. Store extras on a high shelf for guests. This will prevent the inevitable massive dirty dish pile up.

Tip From a Professional Organizer #2: Use matching hangers in your closet so that you can focus on the clothing itself rather than be distracted by an array of different sizes and colors. Also organize by sleeve/pant/skirt length (and color if you’re feeling ambitious). This method not only helps you see what you have, but also see what you might need. For instance - by putting all of your long-sleeve button up shirts together, you might realize that you have an overabundance of the same color or style. Next time you’re out shopping, you might decide to invest in something less redundant.

When speaking of her path to launching Minima, Kristen describes this as a perfect storm of events that she had to get through with complete honesty; losing her architecture job during the peak of the recession, the dissolve of a long term relationship, and oh yeah, fighting cancer. Kristen Ziegler is a bad ass in every sense of the word and truly believes that the services she provides as an organizer go beyond aesthetics, but leads to helping people in a real way. “You can’t control life,” says the 29 year old entrepreneur, “but you can control your environment and that can give you a sense of control.”

Tip From a Professional Organizer #3: Create a “landing zone” (i.e. hooks and a bench or credenza) by the door to keep everything that comes and goes on a day to day basis - keys, bags, store returns, hats, coats, etc. I also keep all of my shoes and jewelry by the door with a mirror to check my completed outfit before leaving.

Kristen is a burst of energy and a pleasure to be around.The Minima owner is an active member of the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) and currently serves as the Communications and Technology Director for the Richmond NAPO chapter. For more information on Minima and the services she provides visit the Minima website or follow Minima on tumblr.

Coming soon: Ever wonder what the apartment of a professional organizer and a true minimalist would look like?

Coming soon: Ever wonder what the apartment of a professional organizer and a true minimalist would look like?

Unfortunately time machines do not exist quite yet but for The Cowboy Prince, he uses his sewing machine and a sincere passion of a forgone time to transport to an era long forgotten. Awakening after a late spring night’s dream, The Cowboy Prince received a grand vision to fully embrace his adoptive lifestyle and to invite others to live to their fullest potential as well. The purveyor of romantic American notion will embark on a year long performance piece; adopting the full time lifestyle of 19th century peddler, pulling a 200 pound Amish cart, selling and sewing sustainably stitched shirts with his original 1930’s hang-crank cylinder shuttle sewing machine.

Not only an expert tailor, artist, and craftsman, the Cowboy Prince makes amazing blueberry pie. The crust was made from scratch.





You would never guess who the boy in the picture grew up to be but he may look familiar and was even called the Cowboy Prince way back then.



Beginning on the streets of Richmond and then traveling 110 miles to Washington, DC, this project is part art show, nomadic tailor shop, and full scale living history revival. With a vision of reawakening and actively engaging the world around us. Visit Custer’s Last Waistband on Kickstarter to find out more and to support.

Unfortunately time machines do not exist quite yet but for The Cowboy Prince, he uses his sewing machine and a sincere passion of a forgone time to transport to an era long forgotten. Awakening after a late spring night’s dream, The Cowboy Prince received a grand vision to fully embrace his adoptive lifestyle and to invite others to live to their fullest potential as well. The purveyor of romantic American notion will embark on a year long performance piece; adopting the full time lifestyle of 19th century peddler, pulling a 200 pound Amish cart, selling and sewing sustainably stitched shirts with his original 1930’s hang-crank cylinder shuttle sewing machine.

Not only an expert tailor, artist, and craftsman, the Cowboy Prince makes amazing blueberry pie. The crust was made from scratch.

You would never guess who the boy in the picture grew up to be but he may look familiar and was even called the Cowboy Prince way back then.

Beginning on the streets of Richmond and then traveling 110 miles to Washington, DC, this project is part art show, nomadic tailor shop, and full scale living history revival. With a vision of reawakening and actively engaging the world around us. Visit Custer’s Last Waistband on Kickstarter to find out more and to support.

Behind the scenes footage of the Brought With Blood shoot by Bree Davis.

Photograph by Matt Licari for Bought With Blood.

Photograph by Matt Licari for Bought With Blood.

Photograph by Matt Licari for Bought With Blood.

Photograph by Matt Licari for Bought With Blood.

Richmond based commercial photographer Todd Wright had dreamed of starting apparel company Bought With Blood for years but was pushed to the back burner in a mix of other projects. Finally, Bought With Blood’s inaugural collection of t-shirts and snap back hats has finally launched actualizing into a lifestyle brand with a greater meaning. Bree Davis and I styled the Bought With Blood Summer 2012 lookbook and managed to take a few pictures behind the scenes.



















You may have noticed a familiar face from last summer’s Urban Outfitters spec shoot.
For more from Bought With Blood visit the website and facebook page. Visit Dirty Richmond tomorrow for Bree’s video and a few of Matt Licari’s photographs from the shoot.

Richmond based commercial photographer Todd Wright had dreamed of starting apparel company Bought With Blood for years but was pushed to the back burner in a mix of other projects. Finally, Bought With Blood’s inaugural collection of t-shirts and snap back hats has finally launched actualizing into a lifestyle brand with a greater meaning. Bree Davis and I styled the Bought With Blood Summer 2012 lookbook and managed to take a few pictures behind the scenes.

You may have noticed a familiar face from last summer’s Urban Outfitters spec shoot.

For more from Bought With Blood visit the website and facebook page. Visit Dirty Richmond tomorrow for Bree’s video and a few of Matt Licari’s photographs from the shoot.

While sifting through a rack of clothing, Christie Thompson let me in on a little secret, “If you begin to view a thrift store as less of a clothing store and more of a fabric store, it completely changes your perspective and opens up possibilities.” When browsing Christie’s Fibre Craft line of handmade accessories, the richness of fabric, colors, and patterns are apparent, but what is the least assuming, is the most surprising aspect of the brand. All of the fabric the Fibre Craft owner uses is recrafted from previously owned and discarded items. With an ever present critical eye and creative thought, Christie is able to transform something characterless like an old pillow case into a purse, or reconstruct the fabric of a woman’s dress into a necktie. The use of recycled fabric gives the wearer a level of quality that has unfortunately been reduced in today’s mass produced culture, as well as somewhat of a mysterious history behind each piece she produces.





After our trip to Richmond’s most unlikely “fabric store,” Goodwill Second Debut Thrift Boutique, we return to the room where the DIY enthusiast creates.





















For more of Christie’s one of a kind accessories, visit the Fibre Craft website, and follow her tumblrs: fibrecraft.tumblr.com and theslicerva.tumblr.com.
Christie will be a featured vender this Saturday from 6-10pm at The Artisan Cafe art/fashion event at Plant Zero. RSVP and find out more about The Artisan Cafe on Facebook here.

While sifting through a rack of clothing, Christie Thompson let me in on a little secret, “If you begin to view a thrift store as less of a clothing store and more of a fabric store, it completely changes your perspective and opens up possibilities.” When browsing Christie’s Fibre Craft line of handmade accessories, the richness of fabric, colors, and patterns are apparent, but what is the least assuming, is the most surprising aspect of the brand. All of the fabric the Fibre Craft owner uses is recrafted from previously owned and discarded items. With an ever present critical eye and creative thought, Christie is able to transform something characterless like an old pillow case into a purse, or reconstruct the fabric of a woman’s dress into a necktie. The use of recycled fabric gives the wearer a level of quality that has unfortunately been reduced in today’s mass produced culture, as well as somewhat of a mysterious history behind each piece she produces.

After our trip to Richmond’s most unlikely “fabric store,” Goodwill Second Debut Thrift Boutique, we return to the room where the DIY enthusiast creates.

For more of Christie’s one of a kind accessories, visit the Fibre Craft website, and follow her tumblrs: fibrecraft.tumblr.com and theslicerva.tumblr.com.

Christie will be a featured vender this Saturday from 6-10pm at The Artisan Cafe art/fashion event at Plant Zero. RSVP and find out more about The Artisan Cafe on Facebook here.

A one of a kind messenger made completely from recycled fabric, an old pillowcase and suede from thrifted clothing. Meet the maker later today tomorrow!

A one of a kind messenger made completely from recycled fabric, an old pillowcase and suede from thrifted clothing. Meet the maker later today tomorrow!

Most Friday evenings seldom consist of scattered animal bones and tree limbs, but this was the exception on April 27 when Angela Bacskocky invited a captivated audience into her Nest. With a successful funding campaign through Kickstarter, Nest actualized into a multidisciplinary artist collaboration of sculptors, musicians, photographers, and Angela Bacskocky and Leslie Hamilton lending their remarkable talents as fashion designers.  As models dressed in Angela’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection haphazardly contributed to the capacious central nest in the middle of the gallery floor as live ambient music softly played in the background; guest were welcomed to an amazing installation and immersive experience.


Follow Angela Bacskocky’s tumblr for more images of Nest and come back at 5:30 to see Bree’s video.

Most Friday evenings seldom consist of scattered animal bones and tree limbs, but this was the exception on April 27 when Angela Bacskocky invited a captivated audience into her Nest. With a successful funding campaign through Kickstarter, Nest actualized into a multidisciplinary artist collaboration of sculptors, musicians, photographers, and Angela Bacskocky and Leslie Hamilton lending their remarkable talents as fashion designers.  As models dressed in Angela’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection haphazardly contributed to the capacious central nest in the middle of the gallery floor as live ambient music softly played in the background; guest were welcomed to an amazing installation and immersive experience.

Follow Angela Bacskocky’s tumblr for more images of Nest and come back at 5:30 to see Bree’s video.

The Final Showcase concluding this year’s Richmond Fashion Week hosted several debut collections from local designers. One of the emerging designers that left a lasting impression beyond the runway was Angela Bacskocky. The designer’s usage of thick and often harsh natural fabrics of leather, fur, and wool, combined with the softness of silk and expertly crafted silhouettes as if they were tailored specifically for the model lead to an interesting juxtaposition of firm but comforting. It is clear that Angela Bacskocky’s Nest collection was thoroughly conceptualized and a compelling salute to femininity and strength.  








Visit Dirty Richmond again this afternoon to see Nest in a much different and immersive setting as well as the premier of the Nest video by Bree Davis.

The Final Showcase concluding this year’s Richmond Fashion Week hosted several debut collections from local designers. One of the emerging designers that left a lasting impression beyond the runway was Angela Bacskocky. The designer’s usage of thick and often harsh natural fabrics of leather, fur, and wool, combined with the softness of silk and expertly crafted silhouettes as if they were tailored specifically for the model lead to an interesting juxtaposition of firm but comforting. It is clear that Angela Bacskocky’s Nest collection was thoroughly conceptualized and a compelling salute to femininity and strength. 

Visit Dirty Richmond again this afternoon to see Nest in a much different and immersive setting as well as the premier of the Nest video by Bree Davis.

Friday Show Review:
Beach House at the Jefferson Theater

Words and Photographs by Gilline Santos

On May 4 2012, Beach House performed at the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville, Virginia where Victoria admitted that it was not only their first show in Charlottesville, but also in a long time. It has been a long two years since Beach House released their critically acclaimed album, Teen Dream

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